Tag Archives: Distance Hiking

PCT Day 144: Mile 2551.5-2576.5 Holden + Stehekin

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I woke to a cold wet bag. I’m not sure if it was cool humid wind from the lake or my warm breath condensing inside of my bag, but none the less, it was town day! I got out of my tent and Pooper was already packed up. Pooper doesn’t mess around on town day!

We both took off, heading down the descent. It was immediately evident that the smoke was back. The valley below was filled and the sun rose red behind the curtain of grey. Pooper and I chatted on as we hauled down the hill. We could see the falls in the distance.

Sissyphus finally caught up and we trekked together seeing the first evidence of the town of Holden. Remnants of very old house foundations lined an old street as we walked into town. Finally we found old log cabins in the town center. We found our way to the hotel where they were still serving the tail end of breakfast!

We chowed down with a group of other dirty hikers. About half way through dinner a hiker came walking up to my seat, I looked up in surprise to find Pickle! I hadn’t seen him since Bishop Pass in the Sierras. I gave the guy a big hug and we caught up between the mouthfuls of food.

After finishing up and paying the bill I decided to explore the town. There was an old bowling alley, pool hall, barber shop, pottery studio, all kinds of cool little hidden gems in the mountains of a secluded town. Eventually we all piled onto a big bus headed for the ferry across Chelan Lake. The ENTIRE town came out to wave us off. It was like a scene out of some Hallmark movie. The bus rumbled down the dirt road packed with hikers and we all chatted on as we neared the boat dock.

Some swam, some bundled up, but soon the ferry arrived and we all piled on. Beer in hand from the boat bar we all sat down and chatted about realizing we were about to go to our last town and resupply. After a quick trip we arrived in Stehekin and headed straight for a nice big lunch. Hikers need fuel, it’s the first thing on our minds when in town!

Food, resupply from the eye-patched postmaster, hanging by the lake and waiting for the shuttle as our sleeping bags and tents dried out. Finally we piled into the shuttle headed back towards the PCT. Piling out of the bus, Sissyphus dropped his phone on the bus seat. To give him crap I picked it up and just sat back and watched him sweat a little. After a while I started taking selfies with other hikers until he realized it was in my hands. After a good laugh we all headed up trail to walk the 5 miles to camp.

Back into the canopy of the forest we plodded on pausing only for water. The chat continued on as our large group meandered to camp. Finally arriving we quickly set up and took over the first available area that was large enough to house 15 of us. It was such a good day. Only a few left!

App Suggestions for Pic Mods: Snapseed

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PCT Day 109: Mile 1718.5 Ashland Zero!

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7.31.18

Sometimes a litle rest is needed!

I woke early as usual, only now I wasnt in my tent. Where was I?! It took a moment before my whits came back and realized I was sleeping on the Hotel floore of Happy and ChilliBin.

We all went about our chores, starting laundry, packing our bags, and getting trail ready. I grabbed a quick snack and blogged for a bit waiting for Happy and Chillibin to return.

We went to a place called Morning Glory for a full on breakfast. If you are ever in Ashland, make it a point to go, you wont be dissapointed!

One breakfast was done we rallied together, got all our things out of the hotel and headed for the postoffice. A day of chores was upon us!

Once done we went to a nice spot for lunch and we looked at each other exhausted at the efforts of running around town and doing resupplies for the next 3 stops.

I suggested we go back to the hotel and get in the pool and have a true zero mile day. To my surprise everyones spirirts were lifted and it was unaimous. It was a well needed rest and well deserved seeing I had been hiking 30 miles plus everyday since Tahoe (with te exception of 25 mile resupply days).

We went back, checked back in, and plopped all finally enjoying our time in town. The next day we would be back on trail, heading further into the interior of Oregon!

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PCT Day 38: Mile 444-454 Hiker Heaven

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I woke wet and damp. It wasnt dew, but something finer, and once I got out of my tent I could see what it was. A fog had covered the surrounding mountains and its humidity must be the cause of the wetness. I got up, packed up, and hiked out of the KOA.

I hiked up and into the fog and it was delightful! At first I thought it would be irritating, but it wasnt cold and the wind wasnt howling. I hiked on and up into a landscape that held large rocks with formations that reminded me of a creek bed.

I saw a coyote stop me, leap from his morning rest spot and take off, tearing up the hill. It was some of the better wildlife I had seen so far! I kept snaking through the mountains. Up and up I went until I was fully engulphed by the cloud. Once I peaked the ridge, I could hear a roar from a road below. I wasnt exactly sure what highway it was, and I couldnt see it, but I could hear it through the thick blanket.

I decended further until I could make out the road and the valley below with the trail leading to it. Soon I met Apineglo, a bearded man in a kilt, from Canada. He was a funny guy and didnt have trouble pirting out obsenities, like water from a spigot. WE trekked on, chatting together and soon safter hiking through a tunnnel, beneath the road we saw incredibe area of rocks that were molded by water and air.

We kept treking in snapping pictures left and right before climbing up the hill on the other side and heading further towards Auga Dulce. WE passed Vasquez Rocks, a pklace with incredible formations. It so happen to also be a site where part of Blazing Sadles was filmed!

After the rocks, we walked a few miles by road into town. WE sat together chatting on while eating breakfast at an open diner. I headed over to the grocery, grabbed my resupply, and headed towards hiker heaven. Once there Sidetrail gave me the rundown of the place. They had laundry, shower, charging stations, computer to use, tv and a ton of movis, plenty of space to camp, and even trimmers to cut your hair if you needed! It was pretty awesome!

After making a quick Lyft run to REI, I returned triumphant with a new pair of shoes, new baselayer, and new sox! Fresh clothes and a shower, it really is the little things in life! Later that night I grabbed some wood and a bunch of us started a fire in the pit. One of the guys who volunteed at the place came over asking if we had asked for permission. The logs and an empty pit was more than permission for me, but then and there I was named Fire Marshall. Apparently I was in charge of extingushing the flame at the end of the night and I could tell anyone to go to bed. Hahha, laughs ensued and people joked about making it my trail name. It wouldnt be the first, and im certain not the last.

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Wallowas – Eagle Cap & The Eclipse – Day 3 – OR (8.21.17)

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Onward!

We woke up, and started the morning ritual as usual: coffee, breakfast, packing up. We had a gorgeous view of both Eagle Cap and Moccasin Lake from our camp, and really had a nice time taking it all in as we got ready. Soon after filtering water and packing up, we headed towards the crosscut that would take us to the base of Eagle Cap. We pulled off our backpacks, stashed them, and I grabbed my day pack and filled it with supplies for the quick 4.2 mile round trip haul to the peak.

Which way? Oh yeah, up!

We started up from the base and all of a sudden the light changed. It was strange, the temperature dropped, and the normally bright day turned to a strange dimmed white light. Almost as if you were looking at artificial white light, it made all the colors of the surroundings mute. I looked at the time and it was right at 10:20. Both Izzie and I had read that the eclipse wasn’t going to start until 1pm, and because we hadn’t grabbed Eclipse glasses, there was almost no way to confirm. At first we thought maybe it would take an hour for the moon to cross.

Looking down on our ascent of Eagle
Light got a little weird and the temps dropped 10 deg!

We trekked on up the mountain hoping that this was only the start of the eclipse. We hurried on, headed up switchback after switchback, really keeping up a good pace. We ran into a group of people heading down and we wondered if they were just heading down and didn’t care much about the eclipse. We headed on, up and up, until we ran into another group, then a third. I feared we missed it and we stopped to chat with one of the hikers. “Oh you guys just missed it, it was at 10:20 this morning!” They were kind enough to hand us their Eclipse glasses and we looked up to see the moon covering about 70% of the sun. Little did we know, the surge of light that we saw was the closest to totality that we would see. We later realized that the eclipse had been posted in Eastern Time since NASA is based out of Houston Texas, and so our timings were three hours behind! Ooops!

Sick views on the ascent (Click to enlarge)
  • Snow!!!!!

It was alright though, we still experienced it in our own way. And besides, we were here in the middle of the beautiful Wallowas enjoying everything it had to offer. We trekked on towards the peak. Group after group passed us heading down before we finally reached the peak at 9572 feet. The snow-capped peaks in the distance and the glacier lakes at their feet were so awesome to see! We could see Razzberry Mountain from Eagle Cap, the Matterhorn in the distance, and all the way down the valley we had trekked in on, as well as the valley we planned to leave on.

Summit views! (Click to Enlarge)
More views from the top! (Click to Enlarge)

We took it all in, chilled for a snack, and chatted with other hikers before watching the last of the moon disappear from the path of the sun. We gathered our things once again and headed down to grab our packs. Reaching the base of Eagle, we strapped our backpacks back on and debated on which trail to lead out on.

Lil glassading action on the way down!

East Fork Lostine Trail 1662 (the trail we came in on) would save us some gain and a few miles, but we would see a whole different part of the valley by going over a pass to Minam Lake Trail 1670. I made the call and we started huffing up the crosscut trail to the pass that would drop us next to Minam Lake. I love me some gain! A few hikers we passed going up the pass saw us coming down from Eagle Cap just before and stopped us to make sure we knew we were silly for deciding to gain another 1000 ft for the pass after already hiking Eagle Cap. I smiled as Izzie and I passed them with full packs, sweating and huffing, but it was all worth it!

  • Back down from the peak, time to grab packs and head for the exit!
  • Pushing on!

We finally dropped into the next valley to the west and after a few miles we reached the edge of Minam Lake. We were both pretty tired and needed a break so it wasn’t long before packs were dropped, and we were in the water! Any chance to get a little clean on a backpacking trek is well worth it! The lake was just as cold as Razz but we stayed in this one a bit longer just enjoying the views and paddling around a bit. Afterwards we posted up on a nice big rock and traded food for lunch, stuffing ourselves with the last of the crackers and cheese, chips, apples, and PB&J we had. We only had a few bars to get us out, but that was more than enough to push the 7 miles!

Minam Lake, what a nice place to chill and take a dip!
Trekkin on =)

We once again packed up after recharging our batteries lakeside and headed towards the trailhead. We chatted as we trekked about how funny families can be, and the quirky dynamics that make them unique. The trek out was just as beautiful as the rest of the trip. Everything was so green, and we were accompanied by the sounds of the Lostine River most of the way. Once again we watched the sun set as we trekked towards the end of our hike.

  • Minam Lake
  • Rock on!

After some miles we made it back to the car, dropped our stuff, stretched out the best we could before throwing our packs in and hopping in Old Red headed to town for Mexican food! What a really awesome trek! Three days in the backcountry, awesome peaks, awesome lakes, awesome views, and awesome company! I can’t wait to come back and explore more!

HIKE INFO:

HIKE STATS:

  • Weather: Hi in mid 60s, Low – 40s, Clear
  • Water: 4 Liters (including breakfast)
  • Food: Instant Coffee, bagel, Triscutes and hummus, 1 PBJ, Orange, Apple, 2 Clif Builder Bar, 2 protein Bars, 1 Bag of Salt and Vinegar Chips, Gummy Worms.
  • Time: 11 hours
  • Distance: 13.7 miles
  • Accumulated Gain: ~2800 accumulated

GEAR:

  • 58 liter exos osprey backpack
  • Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 tent
  • Big Agnes QCORE SLX sleeping pad
  • Cosmic Down Kelty Sleeping Bag (rated to 20 deg F)
  • Jet Boil – Sol
  • Black Diamond trekking poles
  • Black Diamond Storm Headlamp
  • SPOT Gen3 Tracker
  • Sawyer Squeeze – Water Filter

CLOTHING:

  • Smartwool – long sleeve 195 shirt
  • Cotton hankerchief
  • Arc’teryx ATOM hoody
  • Threadless hoody
  • Patagonia Pants
  • Merrell – Moab Hiking Boots
  • Darn Tough wool medium weight socks
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Wallowas – Razzberry Mountain – Day 2 – OR (8.20.17)

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Morning view of Eagle Cap

The sun shone on the side of the tent warming it and waking us. I unzipped the tent and found, to my surprise, a thick layer of frost on the tent fly and everything else for that matter. It was most certainly cold the night before, but I never thought there would be ice! We got moving, starting the morning ritual of coffee, breakfast, and packing up camp. Soon we were back on our feet, feeling so much more refreshed from the night before.

  • On our feet again, Trip leader Tween heads out

Everything was so green and Eagle Cap (9572ft), our target for the next day, stared us right in the face and was perfectly framed by the two ridges that made East Lostline River Valley. We were soon back on the trail headed further into the valley, searching for our next camp. After running into a few other backpackers and hikers we made our way from trail 1662 towards Mirror Lake. What a view, everything was just so gorgeous. It was a bluebird day, the mountains were high, the weather was perfect, and the alpine lakes were calm and serene. After pausing at Mirror Lake to take in the views, we headed east to the far end of the lake were we found a sweet spot to set up camp for the night.

Mirror Lake!
Camp! Moccasin Lake in the distance
Moccasin Lake

Once we had camp all set up, I grabbed my day pack, loaded it with water and snacks, then we headed out in search of Razz Lake, and hopefully Razzberry Mountain (9314 ft) for a good view of Matterhorn and the mountains beyond. The area was like a backpackers dream, it seemed like once you paid the price of the 7ish mile approach hike you could camp just about anywhere and have an incredible glacier lake view with mountains all around! The breathtaking views didn’t stop as we made our way towards the approach to Razz Lake and eventually Razzberry Mountain! We passed Moccasin Lake just below our camp and trekked on passing Douglas Lake, Lee Lake, and just to the north of Horseshoe where the creek runoff from Razz thundered across the trail.

  • Down towards Moccasin

It was time to leave the well-trodden trail and blaze our way up. Izzie was game, with the promise of a lake to swim in just below the peak, she was just as motivated as I to get up the runoff through the steep trail-less woods. We pressed on, tromping through thick underbrush, downed trees and a few creek crossing before, out of nowhere, a trail appeared! “What was this?!” I thought as we trekked on along the faint trail. It seemed to be going the right way and before long we realized it was a small hikers’ trail heading through the beautiful woods and flower covered meadows headed up, towards the lake. Man what luck!

Razz lake! How beautiful!
Looking at the ridge line from Razz Lake, Razz Mountain looming just above!

We trekked on up, and up, until finally we popped out at the end of a large crystal calm lake. We had the place to ourselves, not a person in sight, and we decided to get in Razz Lake for a quick swim! Wheewwwww talk about cold! We were both shivering, but it was still a nice refreshing 40ish degrees! After a few minutes of trying to ignore how cold the water was, we both decided to get out and warm up on the lakeside rocks. What a beautiful day, I looked up towards the peak and the gnarly ridgeline we would need to cross in order to summit. I was curious what it would be like, and we chatted about the approach as we snacked drying in the sun. What a beautiful day, so perfect!

  • Ridge of white rock in the distance calling our name!
  • Taking the path less traveled
Looking down the east side of the ridge line dropoff

We packed up and started up the approach towards the ridgeline. The granite white/grey rock reminded me so much of Yosemite as we ascended. It wasn’t long before we were far above the lake we just swam in and seeing gorgeous views of the Wallowas in the distance. We reached the ridge after a loose steep chossey approach (2 steps forward 1 step back) and began to pick our way across the ridge. Move after slowly calculated move we made our way towards Razzberry Mountain. We clung to the rocks, sometimes Class 2, lots of Class 3, and a few Class 4 spots, the climb was a lot of fun! Junipers were the biggest pain, they tried their best to hold us back, guarding the peak like little soldiers. After an hour or more picking our way across the ridge, we finally made the last few moves and simultaneously touched the highest point on the mountain to gain the peak!!! Once again, we tuckered down and had a nice snack, taking in views of all the gorgeous mountains in the distance. How incredible this areas was, and it was so nice to be far from anyone else on a backcountry peak!

  • Scramble city!
Views from Razzberry Mountain!

After basking in the views, we headed down, back towards a saddle where it seemed the path of least resistance to Razz Lake (which of course is straight down!). It was a chossboss scree surf down some really nice sand/rock back to the trail below. Izzie was all smiles when we finally got down and we chilled by the lake one last time before heading back. We said goodbye to Razz, turned back, and headed back to camp the way we came. We enjoyed the sunset and views of Eagle Cap as we trekked on towards camp. After a few miles, we reached camp, cooked up dinner, and were soon crashed for the night ready to take on Eagle Cap to see the Eclipse!

  • Down we go, scree surfing!

ADDITIONAL PICTURES:

HIKE INFO:

HIKE STATS:

  • Weather: Hi in mid 60s, Low – 40s, Clear
  • Water: 5 Liters (including dinner)
  • Food: Instant Coffee, bagel, Triscutes and hummus, 1 PBJ, Orange, Apple, 2 Clif Builder Bar, 2 protein Bars, 1 Bag of Salt and Vinegar Chips, Gummy Worms, 1 Mountain House: Chicken and Mashed Potatoes.
  • Time: 12 hours
  • Distance: 12 miles
  • Accumulated Gain: ~2500 accumulated

GEAR:

  • 58 liter exos osprey backpack
  • Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 tent
  • Big Agnes QCORE SLX sleeping pad
  • Cosmic Down Kelty Sleeping Bag (rated to 20 deg F)
  • Jet Boil – Sol
  • Black Diamond trekking poles
  • Black Diamond Storm Headlamp
  • SPOT Gen3 Tracker
  • Sawyer Squeeze – Water Filter

CLOTHING:

  • Smartwool – long sleeve 195 shirt
  • Cotton hankerchief
  • Arc’teryx ATOM hoody
  • Threadless hoody
  • Patagonia Pants
  • Merrell – Moab Hiking Boots
  • Darn Tough wool medium weight socks
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Wallowas – East Lostine Valley – Day 1 – OR (8.19.17)

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Izzie and I set out for the Wallowa Mountains in Oregon, in hopes for some good adventure and a good viewing of the eclipse. We had a pretty late start from Pullman headed south, and by the time we hit the trailhead it was 7:30pm (this has been a trend in our recent adventures). None the less, we arrived, ready for anything that was to come! We grabbed our bags from the car, already tired from the drive to get there, both ready to get out of the car and see what the area was all about.

The entrance to the East Lostine valley was from the north end, and from first glance, the approach looked relatively flat . . . at first glance. Within the first ½ mile we were already sweating and panting from the quick unexpected gain and switchbacks we needed to gain to get into the valley proper. The area was gorgeous though, pines everywhere, nice crisp air nipping at us as we pressed on, fighting against the last glimpse day light. We admired what we could see before we were benighted and it became that character building part of the day!

We trekked on, further inward, by headlamp. As we hiked on, the stars finally came out to play and we found large toads scattered on the trail. Perhaps it was mating season? We speculated to why they were right on the trail, as well as debated whether we were trying to dodge toads or horse poop (this was a highly used equestrian area). My headlamp began to die, but I wanted to push as far as we could get into the valley before stopping for the night. I swapped the batteries with another set that I had, but unfortunately it seemed as though they were on the way out too. I hiked by Izzie’s light as she led on, illuminating the toad speckled dusty trail.

Finally my headlamp died all together, luckily we were close to a nice flat area, and it was getting late so decided to set up camp and wait to get after it in the morning. Some good food and sleep would surely do us some good. Man I was tired and so was Izzie, not long after we had the tent setup in the crisp Oregon air, we were both crashed like tranquilized star fishes.

ADDITIONAL PICTURES:

HIKE INFO:

HIKE STATS:

  • Weather: Hi in mid 60s, Low – 30s, Clear
  • Water: 1.5 Liters (including dinner)
  • Food: 1 Clif Builder Bar – 1 Mountain House: Chicken and Mashed Potatoes
  • Time: 2.5 hours
  • Distance: 5.5 miles
  • Accumulated Gain: ~1500 accumulated

GEAR:

  • 58 liter exos osprey backpack
  • Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 tent
  • Big Agnes QCORE SLX sleeping pad
  • Cosmic Down Kelty Sleeping Bag (rated to 20 deg F)
  • Jet Boil – Sol
  • Black Diamond trekking poles
  • Black Diamond Storm Headlamp
  • SPOT Gen3 Tracker
  • Sawyer Squeeze – Water Filter

CLOTHING:

  • Smartwool – long sleeve 195 shirt
  • Cotton hankerchief
  • Arc’teryx ATOM hoody
  • Threadless hoody
  • Patagonia Pants
  • Merrell – Moab Hiking Boots
  • Darn Tough wool medium weight socks
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AZT #22 – Day 1of2 – Saddle Mountain in the Mazatzal Mountains (11.08.14 – 11.09.14)

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20141108_081642

The AZT (Arizona Trail – 800 miles) spanning from Mexico to Utah across the great state of Arizona was added to my list of wish hikes as soon as I found out about it. Unfortunately I don’t have the vacation or off time to be able to through hike it straight for 60 days, so instead I have been section hiking it when I can. I had the opportunity to knock out the 22nd section this weekend and I jumped at the chance!

I dumped my truck right off of Bee line highway 87 Saturday morning and set out on the trail. After navigating a wash that goes under the highway I popped out in rolling hills and wide open views. There are a few cattle gates to navigate, just be sure to leave them as you found them, be it opened or closed. The trek starts flat to begin with on a few 4X4 roads, the pushes you into some canyon washes that are hardly ever traveled. A small creek was running through the wash to my surprise. I pushed through the canyon around a few switchers where I was once again greeted with huge wide open views. There are some power lines here, what seems to be the last sign of civilization looking forward, turning back there are a few small farm houses in sight.

Pushing further on, the trail gets back to single track hopping up on creek banks and back into washes until once again your greeted with huge wide open views and a trail that meanders along through it all. I found myself skirting the lower portion of Saddle Mountain when I came across Kim and Norm, 2 hikers from Phoenix who were turned around and looking for Squaw flats. I was happy to have the company and invited them to join me until we passed their junction. We pushed on as a trio talking about experience in the “hiking business” and how long they have both been at it.

Wide open spaces
Wide open spaces – Saddle Mountain – Click to Enlarge

As the trail skirted further we came across Ranger Mark Suban and his trail maintenance crew of about 8 old and young. I had never seen a crew out working before and was delighted to stop for a second and chat with them and thank them for their service to the AZT. Those guys keep the trail going and it’s always on a volunteer basis!

Incredible views!
Incredible views! click to enlarge

Leaving the maintenance crew behind we trekked on until we found the switch back drop off into a patch of pines where the 3 amigos would split ways. We stopped for a quick lunch and chatted about our jobs and hikes we wish we could do. Soon I packed up and pushed the last 4 miles out to Peeley trail head where I would camp for the night. Those 4 miles were definitely not as forgiving as an easy trail skirt around the base of Saddle Mountain! Drop offs, washes, a section I affectionately call the ‘tunnel of love’ with manzanita and holly bushes surrounding a water channel. Big grind elevation gains with astonishing views and quite a bit of bushwhacking and trail finding through tricky washes finally brought me to the intersection of AZT#22 and #23.

20141108_155622(0)

The Peeley trailhead was just a 0.5 mile push ahead. It was only 4pm by the time I reached it and I was ready to just set up camp, make a Beef Stew Mountain house, and kick back for a bit finally cracking a book I purchased a month ago. What a good first day, as temps began to drop I crawled into my tent and read by headlamp for a few hours until I finally crashed. The next day would mean my return journey back to the truck with another section of the AZT in my pocket. (Post Continued on Day 2/2)

  • Tunnel that goes under highway 87 - this is a portion of the AZT!

Hike information: http://hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=2436

HIKE STATS:

  • Weather: Hi 60s, Low in the upper 40s, Sunny
  • Water: 8.5 liters
  • Food: 2 Nature Valley Peanut butter granola bar, 2 Clif Bars, 1 Clif Builder bar, 1 Meal replacement protein bar, 2 Nature Valley Protien bars, 1 bag of beef jerky (3oz), 1/2 sandwich ziplock of trail mix, 1 avocado, 1 via Starbucks instant coffee, 1 Quaker Real Medleys, 1 Mountain House Beef Stew meal
  • Time: 8 hours day 1, 7 hours day 2
  • Distance:16.5 Miles one way

GEAR:

  • 58 liter Exos Osprey backpack
  • Big Anges UL2 tent
  • Flash REI sleeping pad
  • Cosmic Down Kelty Sleeping Bag (rated to 20 deg F)
  • Jet Boil – Sol
  • Black Diamond trekking poles
  • No water filter – I carried all my water in (8.5 liters – I should have brought 10) to train for a hike coming up where I would be carrying a lot of excess weight. Advise: Bring a filter! There are creeks and opportunities to use it.
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South Mountain – Big Box Loop 11.04.14

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South Mountain is one of those hidden gems that so many people seem to overlook and underrate for one reason or another (those of you who frequent this park know what I am talking about). I have news for you, this 16,000 acre Park is a powerhouse! So many opportunities to rack up huge miles, and really pick up some good gain if you know which trails to go after. Most people think of it as a Mountain bike haven, granted it is, but so much more!

This afternoon I let out from work with a distance training loop in mind to beat down before the sun set on me. I planned on starting on Holbert trail, then tying into National trail for a few miles before bombing down Kiwanis and finishing the loop with Los Lomitas trail and Box Canyon Loop to get back to the truck.

Temps were once again as they have been this week, just like baby bears porridge: just right (low 70s)!! I started out knowing I didn’t have much time to crank out this loop so I was on a mission to get my butt moving. Holbert trail is a great trail for anyone, and deff a recommendation of mine for people just breaking into the hiking scene. The elevation gain doesn’t kill to much and the milage is decent, especially if you take the offshoot to dobbins point for some great views of the city.

At any rate, I kept trekking on and was just totally humbled by the views of the sunset on the trail. I couldn’t put my camera down!! Every time I turned a corner there was another incredible Kodak moment to be captured, I couldn’t help myself but snap a few.

Finally the sun was setting as I descended the last stretch of Kiwanis trail and I was forced to break out the headlamp. I jumped onto Los Lomitas and followed it to Box Canyon Loop (I got off track a few times in the dark). Finally after a small road side trek I found Box Canyon Loop once again and finished out the loop. The following pictures show show some a progression of the trail and the incredible sunset I was honored to witness!

  • First view of holbert from the canyon - White water tank on left

Aerial topo shot of the GPX trail I completed.

7.0 Miles, 2 hours 23 minutes, Temps: 70s, 0.75 liters of water, 1 protien bar, 1 nature valley granola bar

Screenshot_2014-11-04-18-45-54

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South Mountain – Two Ridge Tango 11.02.14

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View of the Northern Ridge of SoMo from the Southern Ridge up on National Trail (click to enlarge)

The Two Ridge Tango – a sweet loop on SoMo (South Mountain) consisting of 14 miles of some official and some not-so-official trails.

Was an awesome day in Phoenix with killer temps and even better views. Just needed to get out and grind down some miles to recenter myself. Nothing like some good quality time on a trail to get your head right!

I was surprised to see the amount of people out, but with such perfect weather (60s and overcast) how could you not take advantage. The hike starts with a grind up Warrior (non-official) trail. [Get to the trailhead by going south on 19th Ave until dead ending into SoMo] The gain is killer quick to start with 900 ft of elevation gain in 0.84 miles. I scared up about 5 coyote’s on the push up the ridge. After seeing these guys I hiked for a while with rocks in my hands like ready catapults just in case, but it was really cool seeing such a wild animal so close.

Hit the ridge and went to work on the loop. I came across 2 small groups of people on Alta trail coming from the neighborhoods in South Phoenix, another couple riding horses (sipping on cervezas), and later a big boy-scout troop putting down a 10 miler up on National trail.

I made sure to touch Maricopa peak (highest point near Alta trail) and Goat Hill (high point just east of where Ranger trail ties into National). Took a few picks, enjoyed the views and kept trekkin.

Finally dropped down Ranger and worked my way across the desert and found an old use trail that went up the Ridge, spoke with a cool family of 4 just hanging out and enjoying the views on the North Ridge of SoMo for a moment before pushing on, finishing my loop and getting back to the truck.

2.5 liters of water, 5 hours 0 mins Time, 1 clif bar, 1 avocado, 1 natur valley peanut butter bar, 1 protien bar, 1 plum

Nothing can be said for just getting out and putting a grind down on some trail and really just putting everything behind you and enjoying being outside!

Below is the aerial topo GPX for the loop

Screenshot_2014-11-02-15-43-12

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